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Polarsonde: A Meteorological Sensor To Detect Aircraft Icing Hazard

General

Organisation
Project start
01.01.2012
Project end
31.12.2013
Type of project
ARMAP/NSF
Project theme
Weather, climate & atmosphere
Project topic
Meteorlogy

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
10.07.2012
Fieldwork end
22.07.2012

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland Ice Sheet
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 72.57, -38.48

Fieldwork start
13.07.2012
Fieldwork end
20.07.2012

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
10.07.2013
Fieldwork end
19.07.2013

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland Ice Sheet
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 72.57, -38.48

Fieldwork start
11.07.2013
Fieldwork end
16.07.2013

SAR information

Project details

02.07.2019
Science / project plan

.

Science / project summary
The aim of this project is to develop an expendable probe, which when attached to a standard radiosonde, will become the first low-cost routine technique to detect super-cooled liquid water in clouds. Beyond simply detecting super-cooled liquid, polarsondes will help to answer a number of scientific questions, by determining the ratio of liquid to ice in mixed-phase clouds. Current meteorological models use an ice fraction for clouds that is calculated from the temperature profile of the atmosphere. Even in the northern mid-latitudes, the few tests that have been made show that this assumed relationship is incapable of capturing the natural variability of the ice/liquid partitioning. Furthermore, observations by satellite have shown that clouds containing liquid water below 0°C are more frequent than current meteorological models predict. Radiosondes are the only routinely used meteorological device that can profile the interior of a cloud, but they are limited to sensing water vapor (as well as temperature and pressure) and not the liquid or solid phases. Polarsonde will overcome this limitation, by enhancing radiosondes to enable detection of super-cooled liquid water. It will distinguish the spherical liquid droplets from nonspherical ice crystals by exploiting the fact that they affect differently the polarization of the light that they scatter.
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